Welcome to the Machine Age: How #robocomms are changing communication

Articles

 

Credit: istockphoto.com/mikkelwilliam

Credit: istockphoto.com/mikkelwilliam

Recently, I’ve been chatting with quite a few people about the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on communication, or what I’ll call “#robocomms.”

What I’ve found fascinating about these conversations is that nearly every one of them has ended with the same question: Where are these robots hiding? Where can I find applications that are using AI to automate communication tasks?

Increasingly, the answer is “everywhere.” There’s a rapidly growing number of tools that are using different forms of AI to automate different forms of communication.

Not all of them are as polished as they could be, and not all will be of immediate use to every communicator. But they all give an insight into how AI is poised to fundamentally rewrite not just the way we communicate, but the power and impact of what we do.

Here are just a few examples of these types of tools.

Microsoft Presentation Translator

Imagine creating a presentation for a multilingual audience. Anyone who’s done this before will know it’s a major headache. You either have to script and translate everything (including your speech) or you need to give your presentation the full United Nations treatment, with batteries of translators speaking into audience headsets.

The Microsoft Presentation Translator (MPT) provides a simple solution to this problem. It lets you translate not just your slide content and notes, but also your spoken remarks, into more than 60 different languages. What makes the Presentation Translator particularly clever is its ability to “learn your language” as you go. This helps to improve the accuracy of the translations, particularly when it comes to technical terms and jargon.

With MPT, you can:

  • Quickly translate slides and notes into a range of different languages.
  • Translate your spoken remarks and present them either as subtitles on the screen or via a mobile app that each audience member can download and personalize.
  • Field questions in a range of languages.

 

Read the full article in Communication World

Comments